BACANA MAGAZINE hotel occidental punta cana
BACANA MAGAZINE hotel occidental punta cana
BACANA MAGAZINE hotel occidental punta cana
BACANA MAGAZINE hotel occidental punta cana
The drink to die dreaming

The drink to die dreaming

Like a title of a romantic tragedy in literature, Morir Soñando (Die dreaming) is, probably, the most recognized Dominican drink. It shares its uniqueness with the culinary traditions of the rest of the Spanish Caribbean.

A delicious drink that mix milk and orange juice. Yes, it’s something unusual, if we consider that milk gets curdled when we add any acid substance. In fact, it is accepted by everyone that curdle milk is harmful to health because it can be a sign of deterioration. If we do not conserve this raw material adequately, numerous microorganisms (mainly lactic acid bacteria) that are able to ferment lactose (milk sugar) will be develop in it. As a result of this fermentation, lactic acid is produced which causes a drop in pH and then the milk gets curdled.

However, if the mix of milk and citrus is made at a very low temperature, this process does not occur. Hence, the importance of using abundant ice for the preparation of the drink.

Die dreaming origin is uncertain, but all historians conclude that its creation was after the arrival of refrigeration to the country, with the use of ice to cool drinks. However, if we go back to the traces of the past, the habit of cool drinks takes us to the Egyptians at first and then to the Romans. In fact, Emperor Nero already used snow to cool his fruit juices and the wines he used to drink. Later, in the Asian continent, during Marco Polo journeys, several recipes of frozen desserts prepared in China were collected. That idea moved to Europe, so in the Renaissance its use was widespread. In the XVI a legal norm was developed to regulate this emergent and profitable commerce that had an enormous economic impact. In the mid-nineteenth century, due to the tenacity of Frederic Tudor, ice cubes were popularized. This North American saw a great business in the transport and fractionation of large frozen blocks.

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TEXT: Alana Fernandez; IMAGES: Suresh/Archivos

Tags: Traditions

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