BACANA MAGAZINE hotel occidental punta cana
BACANA MAGAZINE hotel occidental punta cana
BACANA MAGAZINE hotel occidental punta cana
BACANA MAGAZINE hotel occidental punta cana
Patronymic surnames, personal identity symbols

Patronymic surnames, personal identity symbols

People are identified by a name and one or two surnames depending on the region. For example, in Argentina until 2008 it was used only father’s surname. To conect our surnames with our ancestors’ is not only an act of faith it’s also an evolutionary sign of our roots. The name connects you to a lineage, and we all need that connection, especially from a certain point of life where you start to think about finitude and therefore the ancestors and progeny we left.

In the Dominican Republic, origins of surnames mostly of Spanish origin have different categories. Patronymic surnames are those from the name of the person with more hierarchy or influence. The most common are the one finished in "ez" which means "son of" although its origin is unclear. That is how many surnames were formed such as Alvarez, Ramirez, and Dominguez. But it also apply to Muñoz (son of Muño), Ortiz (son of Ortun) or Sanchis (son of Sancho). The country also highlights the Gonzalez, the Martinez, the Fernandez, the Garcia, the Rodriguez and Perez.

Rodriguez is a patronymic surname that comes from the ancient kingdom of Leon, current Kingdom of Spain. Dating back to the early Middle Ages, around the eleventh century. It means "son of Rodrigo" or "Rodericus" a Germanic root name that was Latinized. Something similar happens with the surname Gonzalez, derived from the name Gonzalo also very common during the Medieval period. Its roots are Visigoth; this last name was spread almost throughout the Iberian Peninsula.

Fernandez is another name widely spread, its genealogy indicates a variant of the name Ferdinando, which comes from the Germanic Fredenand or Fridnand (Gothic *Fri-nan* “courage” “protector" but also has been interpreted as *Far-nan* "courage for the trip")

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TEXT: Zaida Sanchez; IMAGES: Archivos

Tags: History

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